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Attn: People who use Commsec - Query

Discussion in 'Shares' started by Sk3tChY, 9th Aug, 2007.

  1. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    Fellow Commsec brothers, (And sisters, we can't be sexist.)

    I currently hold some shares in CBA, and i'm hoping to soon purchase some more soon using my commsec account.

    I was just wondering;

    Will they be displayed seperately from my intial CBA holdings?

    Example:
    If I currently held 100 CBA shares, and bought another 100 CBA shares in a completely seperate transaction, would it display two lots off 100 CBA shares, or one lot of 200?
     
  2. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    They will be displayed together. eg 200 CBA shares.

    Steve
     
  3. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    Thats a load of crap, is there anyway I can have them seperated..?

    Having them join't together makes monitoring their individual performance a pain in the ass... I like being able to simply view my holdings and have all the calculations done for me.

    Stupid Commsec, imma complain!

    I thought it would have been common sense to have them seperated to make monitoring their performance easier, but obviously common sense isn't very common.
     
  4. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    You can just as easily monitor performance based on an average buy price.

    Eg. you buy 100 shares @ $20 and another 100 shares @ $22, means you have 200 shares and you paid $2000 + $2200 = $4200 for them, making your average buy price $4200 / 200 = $21

    The only thing that average buy prices don't take into account is holding time (eg if you want to work out an annualised compound return for each individual share parcel - but that is possibly of little value in the grand scheme of things).

    Alternatively just do a spreadsheet :D
     
  5. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I know I could average it out, and ultimately it wouldnt make a difference, but as you mentioned, I'd like to know my return in comparison to my holding time.

    And plus i'd like to know how much money i've made of each set of shares.

    As you said tho, i'll probably have to make a spread sheet. I'll prob just make one with formulas in it, so I can just enter the current value of the share and it will show a % of how much i've made on each set.
     
  6. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    That would be the whole point of using a spreadsheet - to do exactly that ! :D
     
  7. bundy1964

    bundy1964 Well-Known Member

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    Do they have a detailed option to display them like E*trade does?
     
  8. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    What can I say, great minds think alike? :p
     
  9. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    Negative my dear sir, not that I know of.

    E-trade was voted best broker out of some investor magazine I read. I think because the brokerage fee's are less than commsec.
     
  10. voigtstr

    voigtstr Well-Known Member

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    transfer it over to etrade then ! :)
     
  11. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    But commsec is so pretty...

    All the pretty colours and graphs...!

    Plus... It's the only thing i've used so far, I pay $20 per transaction... How much do you pay on e-trade bundy?
     
  12. voigtstr

    voigtstr Well-Known Member

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    dude! check their website!
     
  13. bundy1964

    bundy1964 Well-Known Member

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    Just looking at the rate I always seem to have paid the 10+ trade price regardless of how many trades I have had ( fairly sure I havent made 10 or more in a month )

    It might just be me being old and grumpy but I prefer the charts that are on the ASX website rather than the pretty ones on the online brokers.
     
  14. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    What you mean 10+ trade price..?

    $10 + ??
     
  15. bundy1964

    bundy1964 Well-Known Member

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    Standard price - $32.95
    After 10 trades - $27.45
    21+ trades - $21.95

    I have always paid the 10-20 price.
     
  16. DaveJ

    DaveJ Well-Known Member

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    Not Ideal

    Not Ideal but you could use the 'watchlist' feature of comsec... Then you can enter two separate prices/Quantities and i'll show you them separatly.

    ???:confused:

    DaveJ


    P.S. Guess you are not a fan of the DCA(T) - Dollar Cost Averaging/Trading strategy if you want to keep all the trades 'separate'??:rolleyes:
     

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  17. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    I'm assuming you meant to write DCA and not DCT ? :eek:
     
  18. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    I love this guy... legend mate..! Imma do that..! :)

    I sent you a pm btw, not sure if you got it.
     
  19. Sk3tChY

    Sk3tChY Well-Known Member

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    Correct me if im wrong sim, I only read up on DCT in an article not long ago.

    My understanding is that DCT is basically when you buy a share while its down and at a good price, and then sell it when it goes up and makes a good profit, basically short term stuff. Is my understanding correct?

    And whats DCA..?
     
  20. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    I wouldn't put it quite like that ... using terms like "good price" and "good profit" imply things other than what is actually happening.

    The NavraInvest Dollar Cost Trading system simply trades the volatility, buying as shares drop in value and selling as they rise.

    It's not about being "good", that implies a judgement call is made on when to buy and sell. The NavTrade system is a reactionary mechanical system - it buys and sells reacting to the market, not trying to predict it.

    This is of course coupled with a human driven fund selection and weighting mechanism to ensure that only good quality stocks are being held - but the trading itself is completely (metaphorically) mechanical.

    DCA = Dollar Cost Averaging ... a system promoted by most fund managers and financial planners are a great way to make money (for them !!!!!!).

    It's basically like the automated savings plans you see with most funds, where you make regular additional investments without regard to the unit/share price.

    Their theory is that when prices are low, you get more shares/units for your money, and when prices are high, you get less ... thus evening things out.

    Their suggested benefits are not really valid (in my opinion) - there is no inherent benefit to investing using this strategy beyond the fact that you are actually investing - which is better than not investing !!! (most of the time :eek: !!)

    If you are a buy-and-hold-forever kind of person and reinvest distributions/dividends, then Dollar Cost Averaging is not so bad - it won't really matter so much what price you buy at.

    Also - any dividend/distribution reinvestment plan is essentially a form of DCA !!