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Battle Axe Blocks

Discussion in 'Real Estate' started by tonyused, 30th Apr, 2008.

  1. tonyused

    tonyused Active Member

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    9th Jan, 2008
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    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    Has there been any threads about these type of blocks?

    I've never heard of the term till recently, maybe because they are rare in Perth, & I was wondering how they got their name.

    I think it's where there is a common driveway on the one property with two houses.

    Where in Australia are these type of blocks common & what is the reason for having blocks like this?

    Do investors buy these type of properties?
     
  2. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Typically battle-axe blocks arise from a larger block of land with a house already on it being subdivided into two smaller blocks - usually with the new house down the back of the existing house ... the long driveway (which may or may not be shared) forms the "handle" of the axe.

    There have been a lot of these in the northern suburbs of Sydney where blocks are typically large - although I think the councils have tightened up regulations in recent years.
     
  3. Jacque

    Jacque Team InvestEd

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    Sydney
    Hi Tony

    In some suburbs of Sydney these type of properties are more common than others. Watch for land sizes, though, as you can be misled thinking a block is big but the handle driveway part actually can add a significant amount to the total block size. A typical 3.5m x 40m driveway can add some 132sqm, for example.

    As an investor, you have to decide if this type of property is right for you. Generally, however, I'd stay away from them as an IP as they tend to take longer to sell and tenants don't always appreciate the fact that, though private, they also lack security for the same reason.

    Some battleaxe blocks are ok, as they are visible from the street, have a relatively short handle (eg cul de sac properties) or an extra wide drive but most of them aren't easily seen from the street and access can be a problem.
     
  4. tonyused

    tonyused Active Member

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    9th Jan, 2008
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    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    Thanks for the info & replies.

    So the driveway simulating the handle of an axe gives them the name.

    OK, so these sort of blocks came about in suburbs with large blocks where the owner was allowed to build at the back or subdivide as long as a driveway could allowed access to the rear block.

    That makes sense now, thanks.

    Maybe they may have redevelopment potential.
     
  5. Jacque

    Jacque Team InvestEd

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    Location:
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    Street frontage and access is vitally important when considering suitable blocks for rear dvpt opportunities- check with your local council first and read their DCP material to ensure you are able to develop.