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BPL

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Tropo, 22nd Jun, 2007.

  1. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17th Aug, 2005
    Posts:
    3,396
    Location:
    NSW
    I am one of the first 20 users of a new broadband internet provider.
    I have had just installed a new Broadband Over Powerline (BPL).
    It is so far 2x faster then my existing Broadband (512k) and seems to work very well at the moment.
    System is using existing powerlines to send broadband signal. It is under a trial in NSW's few selected suburbs at the moment and it may be available to the public at the end of the year. It is installed by Country Energy and Freshtel.

    I will keep you posted how it goes.

    :D

    PS
    I also got a free VoIP phone. It works as well -so far:p . Only 10c anywhere in Australia. No time limit.
     
  2. Glebe

    Glebe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15th Aug, 2005
    Posts:
    932
    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    Cool stuff Tropo.

    Is it in Sydney?

    What is your download limit and the price of the service?
     
  3. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17th Aug, 2005
    Posts:
    3,396
    Location:
    NSW
    No. It is in country NSW.
    At the moment it is all free for 6 months and unlimited downloads/uploads.
    They do not have a pricing as yet as it is on trial.
    It still works very well and it is 2.5x faster then my current ADSL.
    Country Energy - home
    :D :cool:
     
  4. voigtstr

    voigtstr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24th Jan, 2007
    Posts:
    679
    Location:
    Hobart
    Aurora was trialling internet over power lines in Hobart and were worse than telstra in terms of download limits.
     
  5. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    9th Jun, 2005
    Posts:
    4,623
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Probably because, as with any new technology that doesn't have good market penetration yet, the relative cost of infrastructure is very high - prices will come down (or more the point, value will increase) as it becomes more widely available.

    I do remember that the first trials of the technology caused widespread concern due to the radio frequency noise it generated ... I think it was affecting radio signals for small aircraft. This effectively killed the technology for quite a few years, but the latest I've heard is that they solved this problem and it is now pretty good.

    Personally I'm not a fan of the technology - I think that fibre and wireless have much greater longevity.