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Building a duplex against Council rules?

Discussion in 'Real Estate' started by develop28, 20th Dec, 2008.

  1. develop28

    develop28 New Member

    Joined:
    20th Dec, 2008
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    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    Hello!

    I recently bought my own home and realised that the land is way too big for me. My neighbours have in fact subdivided and built a duplex on their property. I thought it was a good idea so I started researching my options. Council rules say you must have at least 600sqm to subdivide and a frontage of 15 meters. I am a bit short of both of those things. However, I am on a corner block and was planning to make the two properties face different streets. Also, I do live in a beautiful old house and do not intent to knock it down only build another detached house. Also, according to my own measurements I would be able to satisfy all of the remainder council rules such as floor grass ratio, design, off street parking adequate boundaries etc etc. I was wondering if anyone has been able to get approval for a house or duplex where everything else other than the land size fit? I did speak to duty planner but they do not want to give me any information until I engage a surveyor and an architect so that they could see what my plan looks like. I thought I might ask anyone out there for experiences before I decide to spend a lot of money on surveyor or architect.

    Thanks for your time
     
  2. MrDarcy

    MrDarcy Well-Known Member

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    Which council?

    I'm sure there are people on this forum experienced dealing with councils. If you can supply the council name and zoning, that would assist.

    Most councils will allow some variations on DCP requirements, usually when supplied with justification and compromise. Some rules are set in stone and land area is often one of them.
     
  3. C3PO

    C3PO Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Adelaide, SA
    Most councils have some flexibility about such things - at the end of the day they would like to have more ratepayers.

    Being on a corner block will work in your favour. I would suggest that you make a development application seeking approval to subdivide the block, you can find people to do this for you or do it yourself, shouldn't cost you much to get the approval (will only start costing bigger dollars when you actually come to do the subdivision).

    I recommend you also get someone to quote you on the costs, don't know how it is over in Sydney but in Adelaide it's not a cheap exercise so can only imagine it would be more costly over there.
     
  4. develop28

    develop28 New Member

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    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    which council?

    Thank you Mr Darcy it is Canterbury Council and the zoning allows for duplexes. I was hoping land size was something they could compromise on, so that is why I asked for any thoughts or experiences.

    CP30 thank you for your reply also. In Sydney (or at least in my council) you have to build first (i.e. get a DA approved and then build) before you can subdivide. This is why I am asking for experiences before I launch into spending a lot of money on architects and surveyors etc.
     
  5. MrDarcy

    MrDarcy Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Sydney
    I skimmed their DCP14 which I guess you have read. It is quite normal dual occ code. Being a corner lot is not always an advantage as the lots are usually less wide than long so there is not much room to build the dwelling facing the secondary street. This DCP still allows 3m setback which is quite nice.

    I do not know the area, but at a guess lots 15m or greater may not be common as this is the min width in the DCP. They don't want too many dual occs I, especially bad ones. If your lot is less than 15m and a corner, there is not much space to play with and it may be difficult to create a dwelling even if you conformed to the rules.

    You may still be able to proceed with less than 600m, but forget about sub-division.

    You're best bet is talk to draftsmen or surveyors (which I am not, that's my mandatory disclaimer out of the way) who knows the local rules. They can usually say what the council may or may not allow. Unless you are intending to confirm 100% with the code, then you will need professional help.