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cant find fund in PDS

Discussion in 'Managed Funds & Index Funds' started by voigtstr, 24th Jan, 2007.

  1. voigtstr

    voigtstr Well-Known Member

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    Hobart
    Hi guys,

    I thought next pay I might get into managed funds.

    one I was looking at is https://funds.comsec.com.au/Public/Research/Research.aspx?FundID=12791

    however when I downloaded the product disclosure statement, I couldnt find that particular fund listed in ING's list of funds. In the description at commsec it says it is an unlisted investment trust.

    How do I invest in it if I cant select it in the pds and application document?

    (I did send comsec an email yesterday but no reply as yet)

    Cheers
    Simon
     
  2. voigtstr

    voigtstr Well-Known Member

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    Also since the graph seems to be on the up and up for this one, should I wait till they pay June income before jumping in? (last june payment saw a dip in their graph)
     
  3. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    That's a very very new fund - yet to show any kind of track record.

    Any reason you were looking at that one in particular ?

    Perhaps look at Personal Investment Direct Access and compare their funds.
     
  4. voigtstr

    voigtstr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Thanks Sim. Their one year return caught my eye.
    Checking out your link now, Is focussing on Austalian small cap stock funds an ok bet for my first dabble with funds? Planning on adding Asian emerging stocks as well later down the track (when motorbike is paid off)
    (I'm also reading your How to Save Effectively article in an other ie7 tab nice work!:) )
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 24th Jan, 2007
  5. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Location:
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    I suggest you ignore 1 year returns. Last year's returns bear very little resemblence to what the fund will do this year.

    However, I do look at 3 and 5 (and 7 if available) year returns - to show a track record of out-performance. Just don't be sucked in by high numbers alone - a single great year can make their number look excellent for years into the future, sucking people in. I suggest you look at the fund manager websites and see if there are historic unit price charts, and if not, download the unit price history into excel and chart it yourself (remember that unit price drops with every distribution - so you need to add that back in to get a continuous graph).

    I don't recommend any particular fund as a good place to start ... it depends on too many things (your goals, personal situation, your personal opinion on how the market will perform, etc).

    Small caps have done extremely well over the last few years, but we are starting to see a lot more volatility in the markets now, and I suspect the blue-chips are going to start having their time soon (especially if the market turns down at all). Not saying small caps won't continue to do well - but they can't continue forever ... there will be a correction and I think it will be harsh!!

    My first fund investment was in blue chip shares via NavraInvest, and it has served me well. I have since diversified into other blue chip share funds (with different strategies to Navra) and property securities, asian emergin markets, and more. I have some money in small caps, and will probably be adding more over the next few months - but I do see it as one of my riskier investments (small caps generally don't perform well in down markets or with a struggling economy).

    I find that the best way to learn about funds is to invest in them. But only if you can afford to do so - remember there are risks, your capital generally isn't guaranteed !