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Car running on water

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by AsxBroker, 15th Jun, 2008.

  1. AsxBroker

    AsxBroker Well-Known Member

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  2. Billv

    Billv Getting there

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    I can't wait...:D
    This is much better than having to fill up at the petrol station.
    I actually thought that they would have started production of hydrogen fuelled cars by now.

    Cheers
     
  3. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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    The technology to make a car run on water is nothing new and has been patented a long time ago. :D

    Devices that use a little electricity from your car's battery to seperate water into a gas called HHO (two hydrogen and one oxygen) have been around for a while. HHO (also known as Brown's gas or Hydroxy) burns very well and gives heaps of energy.
    The end product of HHO burning is water. So why is HHO so powerful? Because it has the atomic power of hydrogen, and the chemical stability of water. And it is 3 TIMES more potent than gasoline.
    It's more efficient, too. With a regular engine running on gas, you don't get much mileage, because a lot of the energy is wasted in the form of heat and pollution. This is NOT the case with HHO.

    Run Your Car On Water - Using Water As Fuel And Gas
     
  4. DexterJambles

    DexterJambles Member

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    Now we just have to find enough water to fuel the cars! :D

    Puts a new slant on water restrictions.
     
  5. ashwright

    ashwright Well-Known Member

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    Um, Tropo, I have only completed year 12 physics, but how is HHO different from H2O (two hydrogen and one oxygen) otherwise know as water?

    Actually from this site, it appears that HHO is just a water molecule (H2O) split into hydrogen and oxygen (2H2 + O2), which is not very efficient (in fact it consumes more energy than it produces).
    Oxyhydrogen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Not doubting the original poster, but I think the technology has some way to go before it is truly useful (and this is not helped by R&D from the gas companies)
     
  6. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    I do remember glancing at a report recently (didn't read it in detail and can't remember where I read it), which was explaining why hydrogen was not a realistic method for powering cars due to the inefficiencies - you would simply need more water than you could realistically carry or extract from the air ... or something like that. Haven't reasearched it further - so I don't know much about the ins and outs.

    Instead, I think there is merit in the concept of separating energy production from energy consumption. Cars and other internal combustion engines are naturally inefficient (both from a manufacturing point of view and from a fuel wastage point of view). Economies of scale for large power production facilities (coal, gas, oil, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, tidal, gravitational, etc etc) would hopefully be (or could be) more efficient overall - even taking transmission loss into account to get that energy to the consumption point.

    This then allows us to concentrate on the most appropriate method for generating the energy as a separate exercise to finding the most appropriate method for storing and using it.

    Electric motors have become much more efficient, and with computer control we can do funky things like having one motor per wheel which gives us all kinds of benefits from a control and efficiency point of view.

    Also, thanks to mobile phones, laptops and other portable electronic devices, we finally have some serious research into battery technology - with some recent developments looking very promising.

    The biggest problem I see with a battery powered car right now (although future technology may overcome this), is not so much storage capacity and efficiency, but rather, charging times. If it takes much more than 5 minutes to charge your car, then doing it on-demand like we do for petrol is unrealistic. Most suggestions of just "plugging in your car" are all well and good - but they imply that you have somewhere secure to park your car while it is plugged in.

    If you don't have a garage to park your car in while it is plugged in overnight (ie to prevent electricity theft!), and indeed park your car on the street like many people do in cities - then recharging the car becomes a logistical nightmare.

    Then there is the logistics of driving longer distances - if you need to recharge along the way, how long are you going to be stopped for.

    If charging time can be brought down to under 15 minutes, then I think the problem will go away - but if the car batteries realistically needs a longer charge any more than once a year (ie at servicing time), then I think it is unworkable as a general solution and will remain viable only in niche environments.

    ...

    However, I still reckon human beings are the best renewable source of energy - anyone seen The Matrix? :D
     
  7. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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    It seems to be an error...Should be H2O.
    Author pushed wrong button I guess.:eek:
    D2O would be more efficient than H2O.
     
  8. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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    However, I still reckon human beings are the best renewable source of energy - anyone seen The Matrix?
    __________________
    Sim'



    "......Tesla's concept of wireless electricity was used to power ocean liners, destroy warships, run industry and transportation and send communications instantaneously all over the globe.
    To stimulate the public's imagination, Tesla suggested that this wireless power could even be used for interplanetary communication.
    If Tesla were confident to reach Mars, how much less difficult to reach Paris. Many newspapers and periodicals interviewed Tesla and described his new system for supplying wireless power to run all of the earth's industry...."

    Tesla's Biography