Join our investing community

High-rise Suburbs Coming

Discussion in 'Real Estate' started by Billv, 7th Jan, 2009.

  1. Billv

    Billv Getting there

    Joined:
    15th Jul, 2007
    Posts:
    1,796
    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    The Rudd Government is now leading a new push to make Australian cities look more like London, Tokyo and Singapore, which have twice as many people and jobs per hectare as Sydney.

    Under this plan Sydney will be reinvented as a high-density metropolis serviced by mass-transit subways under a transport blueprint being developed by senior state and federal government bureaucrats.

    Powerful new legislation underpinning a proposed metro network costing $13 billion will enable transport and planning officials to reshape the inner suburbs of Sydney, paving the way for apartment towers as high as 15 storeys as well as large-scale retail and office blocks.

    To justify the multibillion-dollar investment, tens of thousands more people would have to live and work within walking distance of the proposed Parramatta Road metro stations, according to planning officials behind the overhaul.

    Heritage inner-west suburbs such as Glebe, Leichhardt, Rozelle and Camperdown are to be among the first to face radical changes should both the $8.1 billion West Metro underneath Parramatta Road and the $4.8 billion CBD Metro go ahead.

    A joint state and federal government study into the West Metro, leaked to the Herald, revealed it would "significantly reduce travel times between western Sydney and the Sydney CBD".

    "It would also provide significant support for transit-oriented development, urban revitalisation and services to new rail markets," it said.

    The controversial population targets in the inner west, set in the State Government's planning blueprint, the Metropolitan Strategy, would be eclipsed by new targets to support a mass-transit subway.

    "It is not to say the Metro Strategy is wrong but the world has shifted," said a senior state planning official. "The next round of the Metro Strategy will have to consider greater in-fill [urban density]."

    But in the face of anti-development campaigns in the inner west, the state Labor Government may have trouble selling the high-rise living plans to nervous western Sydney MPs.

    The Transport Minister, David Campbell, acknowledged that an overhaul of the areas serviced by the metro was a central concern for the State Government.

    "One of the main benefits of this corridor would see the revitalisation of urban growth and employment for communities along Parramatta Road," he said.

    Late last year, a team of advisers from Infrastructure Australia took a bus tour to one such location, MarketPlace shopping centre on Marion Street, Leichhardt, to scout the location for a metro station.

    A new transport authority, quietly legislated by the State Government in late November, has been given unprecedented powers to develop the land above and around proposed metro stations.

    On November 26, a Sydney Metro Authority was created by a special amendment to the Transport Administration Act. It still does not have a board or chief executive but it has new powers "to carry out development, or facilitate, manage or finance development, on land located on, or in the vicinity of, metro railway systems". RailCorp has no equivalent power.

    Concentrating housing around train stations is a well established policy in cities around the world to ease congestion, prevent suburban sprawl and reduce the cost of services such as water, power and transport.

    Infrastructure Australia, a federal body set up to recommend funding for transport projects across the country, said in a recent influential report that residential and commercial densities in Sydney were too low.

    "Increasing densities around rail stations can increase the economic and other benefits that might flow from the considerable public investment in urban rail projects. However, this is an area where governments have a mixed record," it said. "Much more can be done to increase densities around transport nodes. A strong, proactive approach needs to be taken to integrate land use, zoning and planning policies more effectively."

    more here
    http://www.domain.com.au/Public/Art...&headline=Get ready: high-rise suburbs coming
     
  2. Sacko

    Sacko Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20th Aug, 2007
    Posts:
    69
    Location:
    Central Coast, NSW
    Perhaps the planners have over looked the reason's why people are leaving cities like London and Singapore to come to Sydney in the first place....:rolleyes:
     
  3. Billv

    Billv Getting there

    Joined:
    15th Jul, 2007
    Posts:
    1,796
    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    I agree, maybe we should change the planners......;)
     
  4. dudek

    dudek Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10th Sep, 2008
    Posts:
    199
    Location:
    Sydney
    There were a lot of plans in the past; most of them never saw a day light.
    News about building infrastructure in Sydney is taken from since fiction books.
    Reality is plans passed and executed turn into total disaster: 2 lines freeways, dysfunctional new train lines. All this thanks to “expert advise”.
    Change the planners and the government :)
     
  5. Jacque

    Jacque Team InvestEd

    Joined:
    16th Jun, 2005
    Posts:
    1,885
    Location:
    Sydney
    I'm with dudek here :)

    But then again I'm a highly cynical Sydney Northwest resident who won't believe we'll get rail (any kind heavy, light or otherwise!) until not only the cows have come home but they've mutated into other life forms ;):D

    Sydney inner doesn't need more crowding. It's the outer suburbs that need more land releases and infrastructure. Think satellite city planning like Canberra. Far better and more practical in the long term.
     
  6. Billv

    Billv Getting there

    Joined:
    15th Jul, 2007
    Posts:
    1,796
    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    Jacque

    I am optimistic that we will see improvement in our transport system.

    As a NW resident you are entitled to be skeptical of the state government's plans and/or ability to expand our rail system into that region but please take a moment and have a good look around you.

    NW Sydney today is a very nice and pleasant place to live
    It's nothing like it was 10 or so years ago and this big improvement
    despite people's perception it took a lot of public money.

    It's not that NW sydney has been neglected, far from it.

    IMHO
     
  7. dudek

    dudek Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10th Sep, 2008
    Posts:
    199
    Location:
    Sydney
    BV,

    Unfortunately I can’t share your optimism. I have seen it before too many times, I lost any hope. Sydney is a very nice city to live, that is if you can afford to live within 10km from the CBD or Northern Beaches. Most of outer suburbs represent substandard infrastructure. You have to drive and burn 2 litters of petrol to get 2 litters of milk. On positive note, there is so much to be done to improve Sydney that we could go on for the next 200 years to fix what we failed to do in the first bicentenary.

    PS. I do seriously think that 2000 Olympics was THE event of our lives. That is why we will pay for it for the rest of our lives.
     
  8. Chris C

    Chris C Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2nd Apr, 2008
    Posts:
    1,327
    Location:
    Brisbane, QLD
    I tend to think it makes much more sense to increase density in areas closer to the city rather than release more land in outer suburbs. Suburban living is about as efficient, economical and environmentally friendly as a Hummer.

    The whole sprawling suburban lifestyle that most Australian cities have is just not a good long term strategies for city growth. So I'm with K Rudd on this one. Of course this will mean that most Australians will have accept that their 1/4 acre block near a capital city is just a dream.
     
  9. dudek

    dudek Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10th Sep, 2008
    Posts:
    199
    Location:
    Sydney
    When I went to Tokyo for the first time it was easy to imagine that this is how many cities will look like in 200 years. Even if you live in Osaka and commute every day to work in Tokyo you know train will come and you can adjust your watch when it comes. There is no escape from high density buildings. I can only argue tactics of the NSW government. First they approved development of the suburb of the size of Canberra in Sydney Northwest then they collect taxes to build infrastructure to support the area. Taxes are still being collected but they refuse to build North West Metro, instead they shifting money to other place to support business in Parramatta Rd. corridor. Reason why I am very sceptical about any infrastructure projects in Sydney is that government is talking and changing their mind far too often. Two years ago we were told they are planning to build tunnel under Parramatta Rd.
     
  10. Billv

    Billv Getting there

    Joined:
    15th Jul, 2007
    Posts:
    1,796
    Location:
    Sydney, NSW
    Dudek,
    Common mate, I am yet to see a new suburb without local shops
     
  11. dudek

    dudek Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10th Sep, 2008
    Posts:
    199
    Location:
    Sydney
    2 litters of petrol for 2 litters of milk is a metaphor but very close to the fact.
    I leave 1km from the nearest shops so it is too far to walk in summer hit or rain but too short to even start your car engine.


    BTW. You die in new suburb without a car or two.