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If Rudd wins - ASX200 impact?

Discussion in 'General Investing Discussion' started by Rickson, 20th Nov, 2007.

  1. Rickson

    Rickson Well-Known Member

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    If come Monday there is an ALP government in Canberra - what are the likely impacts for specific stocks in the short/medium term?

    I'll start - with the commitment to rolling out a national broadband network, this may impact negatively on Telstra. The Kevin 07 site says that the broadband network will slash telephone bills. Maybe it would be smart to short telecomms.

    Any other ideas?
     
  2. crc_error

    crc_error The Rule of 72

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    What Kevin07 says he will do, and actually does are two different things. I doubt Telstra will be slashing phone bills at their expense just because Kevin07 wants to win a election.
     
  3. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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    "If come Monday there is an ALP government in Canberra - what are the likely impacts for specific stocks in the short/medium term?"

    Negative (IMHO).:cool:
     
  4. crc_error

    crc_error The Rule of 72

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    lol... :eek:
     
  5. samaka

    samaka Well-Known Member

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    Not sure about short term, but I'm in for the long haul on PWK. Internet infrastructure is going to be a big commodity in the future.

    Macworld: News: Study: Internet could run out of capacity in two years
     
  6. Billv

    Billv Getting there

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    I don't know about the ASX as our stock market is more sensitive to international events these days but I am thinking that our AUD will be the first one to be hit and this will increase inflationary pressure.
    Additionally, I am guessing that as they will try to unwind the "work choices" legislation some companies will reduce staff levels and our unemployment will rise.
    IMHO
    Cheers
     
  7. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    I find it amusing that there are still people who believe we live in a two party system. This is from an American site, but it's still relevant to Aust:

    (7) There will be no election in November. To elect is to choose, but we barely have a choice. We do not have two political parties, but rather one party with two divisions. The principle of American politics is to allow the electorate to decide between Candidate A and Candidate A, which encourages them to believe that they have determined who is to be President. It is a system that keeps the incumbents in power, though they take turns being in the minority. Your choices are to vote for either of two largely identical candidates, to throw your vote to a fringe candidate in a gesture of romantic futility, or to preserve your dignity by staying home.

    (8) The genius of our system lies in maintaining the appearance of representative government without actually having it. One technique for doing this is the election-without-a-choice. Another is the concentration of power in distant bureaucracies that in principle are subject to democratic influence, but in practice are not. If, for example, fundamental educational decisions were made at the local level, parents would wield influence. But if policy is made far away, in the state capital and in Washington, parents will have no influence at all. The effect is to keep power in the hands of unions and the ruling elites. They understand this perfectly.

    (9) We do not have a free press. We maintain the illusion, because the government does not control the press. The trick is that the press and the government are in the hands of the same people -- or, if you will, the press is an informal branch of government. They allow the expression only of approved views. We all know what they are. The more important the subject, and the more sensitive, the less we can say. Is this not so?

    From here: Untitled Document

    Mark
     
  8. johnnyb

    johnnyb Well-Known Member

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    <offtopic>
    The Southpark re-run last week said it best: the choice is between a Giant Douche and a Turd Sandwich
    Douche and Turd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia