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Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Tropo, 29th Aug, 2006.

  1. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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  2. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Maybe some of the bio-fuel stocks aren't such a speculative investment :D
     
  3. perky

    perky Well-Known Member

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    Ok, so lets assume this is going to happen (the facts look pretty convincing) - what do you do for you and your family?
    Buy a farm to escape to - somewhere where you can be self-sufficient with water, power, food?
    Suggestions anyone?
     
  4. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    While we weren't a Doomsday Cult :) my family always seemed to prepare for the worst. We lived near a floodable creek and everyone thought my old man was mad when he stored a rubber boat and canned food on our roof. I guess it would have looked clever had a New Orleans style event happened. Used to get me a lot of grief at school though :(

    Probably because of that upbringing I've always intended to have a PPOR with sufficient fertile land that we could become something like self sufficient when it became necessary.

    I'm not as worried about our generation but hate to think what challenges our daughter and her kids will be up against. Consumerism, oil consumption etc is so blindly ignorant of our environment, I cringe when I think what the human race continually gets away with on borrowed time. That's why we headed for the green acreage belt this time in the hope that if it survives the future generations will at least be a bit insulated from apocalyptic shortages of necessities.

    Might be as mad as my old man and his rubber boat, but I definitely suggest considering a "Good Life" block away from the madding crowd in your portfolio at some stage in the next decade, before the 'tree changers' take over with their oil-guzzling Toorak Tractors and wreck that for everyone too :-(
     
  5. handyandy

    handyandy Well-Known Member

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    Interesting and scary read (as ever)

    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"If Peak Oil is "Big Oil propaganda" [/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif](as some claim)[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif], why did Sonoma State University's Project Censored declare i[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]t one of the most censored stories of 2003-2004?[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Surely, if "Peak Oil is Big Oil propaganda", Big Oil would have found a way to get it off the pages of under-funded publications like [/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Project Censored[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] and onto the pages of the mainstream papers and into the 24/7 cable news cycle years ago. "

    We just came back from the US and Peak Oil was actually reported on the cable shows, this was in LA. The context of the cable article was a basic explanation of what peak oil means. I didn't see it again as we didn't see a lot of cable but none the less I thought it was interesting that it was actually mentioned, certainly I have never seen it mentioned on any mainstream Aust shows. (excluding SBS and specialty ABC;))

    Tryhard, did you install solar panels and SHW in the house? also did you insulate the walls, ceiling etc to reduce your heating / cooling needs? If you didn't then you may have missed a big part of 'getting prepared'.

    Cheers


    [/FONT]
     
  6. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Hey HandyAndy

    We're "half" prepared. We are fully insulated, but using LPG as the budget didn't stretch to solar yet. Having said I'm in preparation stages for a green life, I am also a self-confessed multimedia freak, and I could never do without those coal-fired power stations sending me all that electrical goodness to power the office and home theatre.

    We have no town water at the new place hence are gladly forced into collecting our own in tank (but seems even the least green people have tanks these days). We also have a bore (other than me) that's 25 metres deep but at the moment needs electricity to get the water to the surface.

    (As I said I'm more in planning stages for the next generation - as the coffers allow the place will become a little more self-sufficient :) ) I also have a 12 gauge double barrel shotgun - which I figure will deter looters when we are living the high life on fresh fruit and veges ;-)

    Cheers
    Carl
     
  7. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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    Perky,

    If you assume that numbers are correct (oil consumption, production etc....), I am afraid there is nothing you can do.
    Carl on his farm (sufficient farm is a good idea no matter what outcome may be) may survive a bit longer IF worse comes to worse.

    I would not rule out possibility that oil peak story is just another way to ramp up the oil price. Only time will tell if this is the case.
    ;)
     
  8. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    I'd still be lost without access to my favourite forum ;-) We do have a spare valley at the back if anyone is keen on an InvestEd Commune :)
     
  9. Tropo

    Tropo Well-Known Member

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    Hey Carl,
    InvestEd Commune Center is a good idea !!
    Instead of writing we can talk to each other and drink a lot of good stuff....
    :D :D :D :D
     
  10. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    I missed the start of Catalyst this week but am just reading the transcript :

    http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/s1730069.htm

    I can't say I'm proud of my 'ecological footprint' :( . The bit I caught of the story showed that a domestic cat in Australia has a bigger ecological footprint than a human being in India :eek:

    ------------------

    Dr Christopher Dey: A typical average Australian has a footprint of 7 hectares meaning that 7 hectares of Australian land is disturbed to support our lifestyle.

    Mark Horstman: Every year?

    Dr Christopher Dey: Every year.

    Narration: That’s the size of a shopping centre carpark. Added up it means we need FOUR planets to meet our demands.

    ---------------------

    Sobering thoughts. The InvestEd commune might not survive more than one generation :rolleyes: