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Question: is there any aggregation list including shares, managed funds, bonds, and etc?

Discussion in 'Investor Resources & Tools' started by blackbeam, 17th Feb, 2017.

  1. blackbeam

    blackbeam Member

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    I'd like a website or web page which aggregates all the shares, funds, bonds, and etc, and their figures such as interest rate, yield rate, growth, and etc. So people can easily sort and compare in order to pick up the good ones to consider investing. Manually collecting data and feed them into the calculator is slow and inefficient, data is also changing everyday.

    Does anyone have any idea if such things exist? Thanks.
     
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  2. twisted strategies

    twisted strategies Well-Known Member

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    no i don't ( but i wish i did )

    if a Commsec client , the company search tool can be useful and flexible

    but WARNING such data is often not as current as you need it to be ,

    Morningstar provides the data to my two platforms ( both the budget version )

    paying a subscription fee might improve things

    some might also explain historic data is 'rear vision stuff ' ( but sometimes useful ) and forecasts are educated guesses at best .

    austing has posted ( here ) several articles on LICS and those are amongst the most useful i have seen ( but sadly only on LICs )

    look under LICs on the forum here , ( i really haven't seen all equal on normal listed companies nor even REITs )
     
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  3. blackbeam

    blackbeam Member

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    Thanks twisted strategies for your detailed reply, it is very helpful.

    Yes I have visited some of those places, and the information is scattered everywhere. I need to compile and correlate the data into one single place, and do some calculation in order to get a overall idea of which ones are better.

    I guess many people might have the same pain point as me, maybe some have their own Excel sheet to do so, but as you mentioned real-time data is another challenge.

    Thanks and regards,
     
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  4. twisted strategies

    twisted strategies Well-Known Member

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    using Commsec's scanning tool

    i use, say 3 parameters for the first scan ( the parameters are chosen to suit a sector but .)

    say

    1. P/E less than ??? ( if it isn't earning a call it a 'penny dreadful ' )

    2. yield more than ??% ( careful on deciding the yield later , but this is the first cull )

    3. debt/equity ( good for industrials , useless on financial stocks .

    with any luck you are down to 200 stocks ( or less ) out of 2000+

    add another parameter or two to thin out the selected stocks

    PLEASE NOTE RELYING ON EACH OF THESE PARAMETERS HAS IT'S FLAWS !!

    the idea is to give you say 20 stocks to start researching PROPERLY. ( with some hope of finding a gem or two )

    in the current market i resort to stock picking ( picking quality stocks bashed for disappointing on expectations )

    BXB i wanted under $10 ( no luck so far )

    iFL under $8.50 ( disturbingly easy , but willing to buy more cheaper )
     
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  5. blackbeam

    blackbeam Member

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    Is it 'Stock Screener' on 'Tools' tab? Yes I found it very handhy, thanks for letting me know.

    Hopefully in the future there would be other things added to it, such as managed funds and etc to give a broader choice.
     
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  6. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    The problem is that you can't really compare "shares, funds, bonds, etc" - they are all different, have different risk profiles, different purposes, different investment timeframes, etc.

    Comparing a resource stock to a bond is a completely meaningless comparison because the stock will always outperform the bond (until it doesn't - but that's when the buying opportunities arise), but you don't buy a bond for the volatility - completely the opposite.

    I think you need to understand what you are investing in and why you would choose that as part of your portfolio - and then compare other similar investments, not a broad range of unrelated and unrelateable investments.
     
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  7. blackbeam

    blackbeam Member

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    Hi Simon, yes you are right that shares, funds, bonds are different. But I guess from a retail investor's perspective, they have something in common which is return(%).

    A very simple and common question that individuals might ask is like that:
    I have $10K to invest, what options could possibly get me the best return (eg: $11K) in a year time?

    So by looking at return on shares (dividend), funds (return), bonds (interest rate), online investment platforms such as Acorns (interest rate), and etc, the calculation of each of those options is different and complex, which could be daunting and time-consuming for us to do one by one. If there is a place where people can get the final return(%) straightaway, I guess it would be very helpful.
     
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  8. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    But again - you can't look at the % returns in isolation. What about risk profile? What about volatility?

    The advice I typically give to people is - if you absolutely need your money back in 1 years time and don't want to risk your capital (ie don't want to have less than what you started with) ... for example, if saving for a house deposit ... then don't put your money into shares or funds or anything like that. Just shop around for high interest savings accounts or term deposits and park your cash there until you need it.

    It's boring, returns are rubbish right now - but it's the only way to ensure you're not going to end up worse off than what you are now.

    Because nobody can guarantee your capital and past performance is no guarantee of future performance.

    There is every chance that putting your money into the sharemarket will see you lose money over a 12 month period.

    If you're actually investing for longer timeframes - then you don't want to ask the question "what will get me the best return in a years time?" - that's the wrong question.

    If you really are investing for a shorter timeframe then the risk of underperforming becomes significantly higher because losing 10-20% of your money is absolutely a possibility over the short term and that is a significantly worse outcome than earning 3% guaranteed.

    Personally, for short term returns with minimal risk, I see the following as a priority (in order of decreasing returns). To get the best return for your money in the short term, do this:
    1. pay down credit card debt (up to 20% guaranteed return on your investment!)
    2. pay down personal debt (up to 15% guaranteed return on your investment)
    3. pay down your PPOR mortgage (up to 6% guaranteed return on your investment)
    4. park your money in an offset account against your property loans (up to 4% guaranteed, possibly more, depending on your tax position)
    5. park your money in a term deposit (2.5% guaranteed return on your investment)
    6. leave your money in a high interest savings account (2% guaranteed return on your investment)
    7. invest in money market funds (2%+ non-guaranteed returns, low chance of capital erosion)
    8. invest in an ASX200 ETF or index fund (4% non-guaranteed returns, higher chance of capital erosion)
    9. invest in TLS (6% non-guaranteed returns, high chance of capital erosion)
    10. invest in a high return managed fund (potentially higher returns, very high chance of capital erosion)
    11. ... etc
    I'm sure there's other things you could do as well - but hopefully you get my point.

    The "headline" return is only half the story and you absolutely need to take your risk profile and timeframes into account when deciding on the best investment for your money.
     
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  9. twisted strategies

    twisted strategies Well-Known Member

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    i may be older than some here , but i have less than pleasant memories of 'the Building Society amalgamations ' which may have been strictly a QLD thing , where even ' safe ' building societies kept your funds frozen for and extended period of time , while they restructured/amalgamated .

    so while definitely safer ( as long as the Federal government guarantees deposits , see THAT section for details , even that has gotchyas ) , safe and available when you need it will still have a minor risk factor .
     
  10. blackbeam

    blackbeam Member

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    Hi Simon, your listing is actually already a good overall guideline for newbies, well done.

    Yes I agree not only return, but also risk should be included. My ultimate list will be exactly in your format, but be more drilled down to specific shares, funds, and other investment options. For example:

    1. ABC, share, ?% annual return, ?% risk, ...
    2. DEF, managed fund, ?% annual return, ?% risk, ...
    3. GHI, bonds, ?% annual return, ? % risk, ...
    ......

    Most importantly, I can sort and filter on this list.
     
  11. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    How do you define "% risk" ?
     
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  12. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    True - even money in the bank has a risk and certainly not all "banks" (or deposit taking institutions) are created equal.

    There is also an opportunity cost risk of taking the safest option - and you also need to take inflation into account.

    But at least relatively speaking (compared to the alternative), you can generally consider the risks comparatively consistent.
     
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  13. twisted strategies

    twisted strategies Well-Known Member

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    apart from the obvious inflation ( more like taxflation ) and tax due on interest , you may face fee changes or withdrawal restrictions on the cash .

    Basel III is only designed to be a 30 day buffer for extreme situations ( like the crash we are due for ) luckily all Australian banks of any size , seem to have that buffer comfortably in place .... i suppose thinking ahead longer than 31 days is verboten .

    but until better opportunities appear a bank is a reasonable place to keep it .
     
  14. MrMarket

    MrMarket Member

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    Have you had a look at investsmart.com.au? Pretty sure their 'My Portfolio' tool allows you to aggregate holdings and export.

    Otherwise, you could pick up a morningstar account, but it will cost.
     
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