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Thunderbird nerds

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Mark Laszczuk, 17th Jun, 2006.

  1. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    Hi! I'm trying to figure out how to add signatures to Thunderbird and have no idea. Had a squizz in help and got nowhere (bit of a dumbarse when it comes to understanding this stuff). Can anyone help me?

    Mark
     
  2. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Tools -> Account Settings -> (click on account name on left - usually is your email address) -> check "attach this signature" and click "choose" to select a text file you've created with your signature in it.
     
  3. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    Sim,

    No good mate, did all your instruction bits, couldn't find anything related to signatures anywhere. I think my Thunderbird is broken or something. Never mind.

    Mark
     
  4. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Which version are you running ?
     
  5. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    Sim, 1.5.0.4

    Mark
     
  6. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Mark

    Ya sure you don't see the check box Sim mentioned, as shown in attached ?

    I'm on similar version, still have the Signature option...

    Cheers
    Carl
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    Thanks fella's. I was selecting every option *except* the top one. Told I wasn't much good at these things.

    Mark
     
  8. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmm.... I'm beginning to wonder why people think Thunderbird is better than Outlook. Sure, it's free and all, but it's certainly not as user friendly (to me at least) as Outlook is and I definitely don't have the issues with Outlook that I do with Thunderbird. A real pity it's not to Outlook what Firefox is to IE.

    Mark
     
  9. aef

    aef New Member

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    Showing my age....

    I thought the thread was referring to Virgil, Alan, Brains and Lady Penelope.......:)


    BTW Mid 30's
     
  10. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    I must admit I felt a bit the same ... sadly Outlook has sort of conditioned us to a certain way of thinking, and Outlook admittedly has some features that aren't matched by Thunderbird. The other issue is compatibility with PDA's, mobile phones etc, for simple folk like me ... there are tools to let Thunderbird do such things, but not easy ones like the Outlook options.

    I think its kind of early days for Thunderbird (there's alternatives like Eudora, PegasusMail etc - which are well developed but probably clunky in the interface). For mine I'm sticking with Outlook till another year or so of community development probably will take Thunderbird 'above and beyond'.
     
  11. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Personally I've been using Thunderbird since around v0.5, and despite some early difficulties that are to be expected with pre-release software - it is very stable and usable now, and I find it excellent for managing my 25+ email accounts (that's the problem with managing so many websites *sigh* )

    My parents both use Thunderbird, as does my wife - and they don't have any problems with it at all.

    I have never ever used Outlook. Given the history of major security holes in that program - I deem it one of the most evil applications ever unleashed on the public, particularly the free Outlook Express that ships with Windows.

    Up until I started using Thunderbird, I was actually using an email client called PMMail, which was a Windows port of an old OS/2 application (PMMail/2) I started using about 10 years ago.
     
  12. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Definitely a case of diff strokes 4 diff folks.

    We also have to manage multiple websites (88 at last count :( ) and Outlook is admittedly pretty bad at managing the multiple identities. As we have a couple of staff, some of our major correspondence comes via CRM software which beats the hell out of any email.

    Email-wise tho', the last trial of Thunderbird (1.5) found it also sadly lacking for what we needed, and as much of a Micro$oft lack-of-enthusiast as I am, Outlook (full version) still wins hands down for our partic needs. Our guys use third party plug ins (Outclass and Popfile) for managing spam and it is insanely good, and www.BullGuard.com and a hardware firewall for security.

    Personally I think the security paranoia about Micro$oft products is a bit of a furphy - those compromising security generally prey on people who don't look after their housekeeping, and per capita the problems are probably no worse than any other application in the public domain - its just M$oft have such market dominance, more people notice ;-).

    Still keen to look at future generations of Thunderbird though, and considerably less keen to look at any more Micro$oft stuff, regardless how philanthropic Mr Gates might now be :)

    Have fun !
    Carl
     
  13. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    For personal use, I don't think there's anything significant lacking in Thunderbird (or available via a plugin). Business use is another matter though.

    My point about Outlook and security is directly targeted at home and small business users who are NOT savvy enough to know how to adequately protect themselves. Anyone with a dedicated IT team (or with good external consultants) should have the security issues solved - but without that, there's no way the average user would know how to secure Outlook.

    The proof is in the history of rampant viruses and worms spread by targeting home and small business users with unprotected computers - they come that way by default!

    Microsoft simply took too many shortcuts in the name of user-friendliness and took too long to fix them.

    People don't look after their housekeeping because they don't know how. More sensible defaults should be in place to adequately protect the ignorant. It was only in WinXP SP2 that MS first included a software firewall solution!
     
  14. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    The only way anyone can determine if an application like Outlook or Thunderbird is best for them (personal or business) is to read the documentation about their features, install them, and use them both. I don't think deciding if something is from Micro$oft or not really comes into the equation - there are still lots of good things about Micro$oft products - its just easy to pick them as purveyors of all evil because they're huge ;-)

    'Non-commercial' products also contain security holes, including Thunderbird :
    http://secunia.com/product/4652/#advisories

    A user who connects any machine (no matter what systems and applications its is running) to the internet without understanding the implications is just a possum in the middle of an 8 lane freeway - they might survive - maybe ;-) Relying on Windows software firewall would be like putting a crash helmet on the possum - it * might * help :p

    The real problem is :
    a. the people making money out of the masses (M$oft, hardware vendors, retailers, ISP's, Tel$tra) have no incentive to provide advice and service, because helping people doesn't make profits, and
    b. once connected to the internet, users often assume only nice people operate on the web, which is sadly not the case
     
  15. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    I certainly wasn't accusing Microsoft of being the "purveyors of all evil" - this isn't MS bashing, this is Outlook bashing - I was criticising one product which has had a long history of major security issues that really should have been avoided if some more thought had been put into the design.

    I'm referring to the major architectural flaws in Outlook (and Internet Explorer for that matter) which EASILY allow malicious code to be installed on someone's computer without their knowledge. I'm not talking about people doing stupid things - I'm talking about them doing very innocent every day activities like simply opening an email or visiting a webpage.

    Firewalls actually do nothing to prevent this problem directly - but they can help minimise the damage once infiltration has occurred.

    I do note that most of these problems have now been fixed - but it took years, and there are still thousands (possibly millions) of people worldwide running fundamentally flawed software which provides a platform for the scriptkiddies of the world to play.

    I'm talking software design, not computer security.
     
  16. Mark Laszczuk

    Mark Laszczuk Well-Known Member

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    I use Outlook at work and Thunderbird for my personal email (plus the obligatory Hotmail account). I like Thunderbird (mostly) but it's still quite surprisingly lacking in a lot of features. For example, I had to add a calendar as a plug in (or whatever you call them) which I found quite strange. I would have thought that something like that would have come as part of the software as standard by now.

    I'm by no means a heavy user of email (from home anyway) and will continue to use Thunderbird - but sometimes there will be a bit of grr factor going on.

    Mark
     
  17. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Got it. So what are the security vulnerabilities in Thunderbird - do they not count as flaws in software design ? :confused:
     
  18. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Bugs are flaws in coding. I'm referring to fundamental software design mistakes - not bugs. Outlook and IE were actually operating as designed when they allowed malicious code to be installed on someone's computer.

    Outlook and IE were designed to allow easy installation of addtional code required for "rich" web applications. Was a nice idea at the time, but completely lacked any forethought on how that might be abused - as it has been.

    Of course there are vulnerabilities in Thunderbird - as there are in pretty much any software application, but they are not in the same class of problem as those that Outlook and IE had - things which required a fundamental change in software behaviour to remedy, rather than simply a coding fix.
     
  19. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Hmm ok Sim. I guess I'm trying to understand, if someone is looking for advice on which email programs they should evaluate, why Outlook wouldn't still be on the list of candidates (along with Thunderbird or Pegasus or whatever). The flaws you're referring to seem to be mainly historical, and now fixed.

    I'm gonna keep plodding away with my Outlook anyway, not enough incentive to switch to anything I've seen to date.
     
  20. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Carl - I think you may have completely misunderstood my comments earlier in this thread.

    I started by explaining that I was a heavy user of Thunderbird, and that I find it does everything I need.

    I then followed with a comment that I have never used Outlook for a number of reasons.

    I don't actually recall telling people to exclude Outlook from their list when considering a client - only what my personal opinion of the product is based on its history.

    Certainly don't suggest that you stop using Outlook if it works for you, and you are satisfied that you have the security angles covered (which it sounds like you do)