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Top 10 home cover ups

Discussion in 'Real Estate' started by Jacque, 22nd Jan, 2007.

  1. Jacque

    Jacque Team InvestEd

    Joined:
    16th Jun, 2005
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    Sydney
    I read this list recently in API mag and have reprinted an abridged version for the benefit of members. It's from Rod Tanton, manager of Archicentre in Qld. Hope you might find it useful:

    1. Illegal building
    Cost to repair: up to $100,000
    Typical examples are low ceiling heights in habitable areas, dodgy extensions and alterations, and small boundary clearances.

    2. Cracking
    Cost to repair: up to $50,000
    Archicentre says its inspectors see examples of internal cracking being filled and painted and external cracking being hidden behind plants and trellises. If a crack has been filled, plastered over and painted, it can even be difficult for a professional to detect.

    3. Termites, borers and timber rot
    Cost to repair: up to $20,000
    Termites themselves try to conceal their activities but sometimes homeowners help out by patching up floor damage or concealing it under carpets. Access to potentially affected areas is also a factor- watch out for restricted access to subfloor and roof spaces.

    4. Roof problems
    Cost to repair: up to $20,000
    Rusty or damaged metal roofs can be concealed with little more than a coat of paint, Tanton says.
    “Quite often the cover-up merchants will simply paint over the top with some sort of gooey sticky stuff and then paint it all in and make it look nice, only to find within two or three months or six months or twelve months, we’re back to where we were, whereas it should have been replaced in the first place.”
    With tile roofs, silicone is increasingly being used to stick tiles back together in an effort to get a house sold.

    5. Rotten weatherboards and windows
    Cost to repair: up to $10,000
    Inspectors have seen rot patched with filler or covered with tin and painted.
    “It’s a small, inexpensive leap to spend a bit of spare time bogging up a few holes so that people don’t see it but what unfortunately can happen is the timber rot continues even though the paintwork over the top is quite good.”

    6. Rotten stumps
    Cost to repair: $8000 average
    One of the telltale signs of rotting timber stumps is a white, salty look to the bottom of the timber.
    “To cover up those sorts of things people quite often paint the stumps and make them look nice,” Tanton says, adding that access is also often denied to underfloor areas with problem stumps.

    7. Faulty or illegal wiring
    Cost to repair: $6000 average
    Tanton says this is an area where cover-ups get downright dangerous. Cover-ups involve putting furniture in front of problematic power points or painting over them. Quick-fix wiring in roof spaces can also cause problems.
    “We see all too often where people have carried out either bodgy home do-it-yourself wiring or indeed covered up something,” Tanton says.

    8. Faulty or illegal plumbing
    Cost to repair: $6000 average
    Cover-ups involve painting or panelling over rusty plumbing that’s visible and homeowners carrying out their own illegal plumbing connections and extensions.

    9. Damp
    Cost to repair: $5000 average
    Walls and ceilings are at times simply painted or panelled over, concealing the effects of dampness.
    “They’re very hard to see, particularly if the weather’s not raining a lot. If it is raining a lot then quite often the dampness will manifest itself as a smell.”

    10. Guttering and downpipes
    Cost to repair: $3000 average
    Tanton says Archicentre inspectors see guttering and downpipes bogged up to hide rust. “We see that particularly with people selling homes – a bit of bog and spit and paint, and ‘she’ll be right mate, nobody will get up there and have a look’. And they often get away with it.” Some new homes also have secondhand guttering, he adds, an issue impossible to detect from the ground.


    Sobering, isn't it? The most important thing, in my view, after absorbing such a list, is to ensure the building and pest inspector you select is high quality and well experienced with such cover-ups.
     
  2. perky

    perky Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Sydney
    Nice list Jacque, I have printed that off for future use :)
     
  3. Jacque

    Jacque Team InvestEd

    Joined:
    16th Jun, 2005
    Posts:
    1,885
    Location:
    Sydney
    Actually I incorporated into my property checklist, as I think it's quite valuable. It's amazing how we can overlook items when inspecting a home we're prepared to go into enormous debt for. Though building inspectors do pick up on most faults pre-purchase, I think it's still wise to carry out some DD of your own when it comes to checking out the basics such as these.