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wireless without router

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Nigel Ward, 20th Jun, 2006.

  1. Nigel Ward

    Nigel Ward Team InvestEd

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    Okay, let's assume I have two wifi capable notebook computers...but am still in the stone age and just use dial up and thus lack broadband modem and wireless router...

    How do I get my two wifi notebooks to talk to each other, move files from one hard drive to the other without wires?

    Look forward to hearing from the techies... :rolleyes:

    N
     
  2. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    It's called ad-hoc wireless mode.

    1. configure WiFi on each machine to use ad-hoc wireless
    2. set the SSID on each machine to the same value on each machine
    3. set a fixed IP address on each machine (eg 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2)
    4. disable all firewalls
    5. enable wifi connections
    6. try pinging the other machine using the ip address (eg: ping 192.168.0.2) to see if you have connectivity
    7. set up a share on one of the drives
    8. connect to the share from the other machine by connecting using the IP address (eg: \\192.168.0.1\sharename)


    Alternative process #1:

    1. set up infra-red and transfer files that way

    Alternative process #2 (my recommended process for infrequent file transfers):

    1. buy a USB key to copy files between machines
     
  3. Alan

    Alan Well-Known Member

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    Sounds good!!

    :D :D
     
  4. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member

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    Sorry! but while we're on the subject can I ask someones opinion on the following :eek: (Sim')?

    The lease is about to expire on our home computer system. It's a 3 year old desktop and a crap printer thats sucks ink like there's no tomorrow. Currently have ADSL broadband (?) It costs $54 per month for 1 GB and normally runs out about half way through the month :mad:

    Currently 3 users, me and 2 teenages - lots of MSN ing, (them not me) lots of fights for computer time - for school assignments and study (yeah, honest Dad!).

    I have a laptop for the business that is WIFI capable.

    What would be the best set-up so we could all potentially be using the internet at home at the same time? I'm after a good effective upgrade to bring us up to a 2006 level of communication technology.

    1 desktop and 1 more laptop with wireless broadband on the desktop?
    I can envisage a fight over the laptop, or go for 2 laptops.
    Can that be done with 1 as the base or transmitter :confused:

    I still consider myself young but it seems in the technology area I'm having trouble keeping up. :(

    All I want to achieve is -

    1. for 3 people to be able to use the internet with reasonable speed at the same time.

    2. to be able to print reports, assignments etc from any computer - ie not have to transfer stuff to the computer hooked up to the printer but be able to hook any laptop or computer up to a decent printer when required.


    I can understand how much of a pain questions like this can be to the techno-savvy people here but if someone can give me a basic idea of how they would tackle this set-up I'd be forever grateful. :)

    Rick
     
  5. Nigel Ward

    Nigel Ward Team InvestEd

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    On your point about sharing printers, I understand there's some routers with a usb port that you can connect printers to for sharing...but I defer to the tech savvy... :D
     
  6. TakeStock

    TakeStock Well-Known Member

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    Hi Rick,

    I'm not an IT expert, however, I do know my way around the basics. I'll describe my setup - it sounds like what you need.

    Situation: wife and three children, all of whom use the Internet. I have a laptop with inbuilt wifi, wife has a laptop with inbuilt wifi, and kids have an older laptop that has a wifi card. I have cable broadband (OptusNet - I have been very happy with it and it is very quick). The cable modem is hooked into a wireless router which means that all of the computers have access to the internet wirelessly. Additionally, all of the computers can talk to each other and all print to the one printer in the office wirelessly.

    We also have an XBOX 360 hooked up wirelessly to the Internet as well (XBOX live for playing against other people around the world - for the kids of course;) ). In fact, we even use the phone through the Internet now (using Engin). We're sucking the Internet dry!!:D My monthly Internet account costs $60, but I get three months a year free (got Optus TV, mobile with Optus etc). My Internet account gives me 20 Gig a month which I have never come close to using. I'm sure there are probably newer Internet accounts that give more for less, however, I have been very happy with my setup and I don't constantly want to change email addresses, accounts details etc.

    The laptops can be used anywhere in the house (including sitting near the pool;) ). I now get my faxes, emails and answering machine messages automatically sent to my email account, so I can access them when I am away. Gotta love this technology!

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers,
     
  7. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Firstly - ditch your ADSL provider ... you are being ripped off. I hope you didn't sign a contract - you should never enter into a contract for these services - the technology is changing too rapidly and you don't want to get stuck with something obsolete.

    I personally use and highly recommend Internode. Another provider I have heard good reports about from people whose opinions I trust, is Westnet.

    Get yourself a wireless router that is capable of ADSL2+ ... even if you can't use it now, you hopefully will have access to this technology within the next few years. ADSL2+ offers speeds up to 24mbps (current Telstra ADSL technology is limited to no more than 1.5mbps !!, and even the next generation Telstra technology is reported to be limited to 6mbps).

    If you want the most pain free setup possible, consider signing up with Internode and getting them to supply a fully pre-configured Billion 7404VGP-M wireless ADSL2+ router with built in VoIP capabilities. This means you can also take advantage of Internode's free NodePhone VoIP service - which I use at home for both personal and business calls. Internode will supply and configure everything you need, and if you select an ADSL plan at 512kbps or higher, I think you will achieve your goal of getting connected quickly and easily and being able to have multiple people using the internet at once.

    For $59.95 per month you can get a 1.5mbps connection with 10GB download allowance. For $10 more a month you can double that to 20GB per month downloads. If you are fortunate enough to be on an exchange that has already been enabled by Internode for ADSL2+, then you can get much higher speeds at a cheaper rate!

    If you want really seamless printer sharing, I recommend getting a laser printer that has a built in ethernet port (or WiFi port) so you can connect it to your router. This is what I do, and the speed is significantly faster than any other choice. Unfortunately, such printers are generally fairly expensive. Alternatively, you can get print-servers (essentially ethernet to parallel or ethernet to USB bridges) which achieve a similar result (although they are often slower).

    Unless you are really low on cash, I would not recommend getting a router with a built in print server - in my experience that leads to too many compromises. Get a good, reliable router - it is the center of your network, and if it is unreliable, then everyone suffers. Get a dedicated print server device - they aren't that expensive these days.

    Alternatively, you can also set up printer sharing in Windows - connect the printer to one machine, configure it to be shared across your network, and then other machines can print directly as well. The only limitation is that the machine connected to the printer must be turned on for this to work. This is probably the easiest option (and cheaper than a hardware solution).

    Hope this helps.
     
  8. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Hi guys

    In the home office I use a networked laser that was recommended by a printer shop for a few reasons :

    1. Build in duplex (double sided printing) - a lot of the others need additional expensive bits to do this
    2. Reasonably low cost consumables (toner cartridges)
    3. Three year warranty
    4. Reasonable price (as low as $450 lately!)
    5. Good colour reproduction

    The network card (ethernet and WiFi) costs an additional $150 (approx) but its worth it - don't have to muck around with PC's driving the printer etc. and beats the bejesus out of Windows printer sharing for people who have better things to do.

    Its a Samsung CLP500 (or CLP500N means the "N"etwork card is in it) or CLP510/510N. Compare it to the features and running costs of the others the salesmen in the big stores try to sell ya and you'll prob. be pleasantly surprised.

    After a few deskjests and a couple of lasers, I find this one is very solid and easy to use.

    Handy addition to the network if you are planning something on a budget.

    Cheers
    Carl
     
  9. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    TakeStock
    I'm loving Engin service too - 98% reliable (easily comparable with Telstra) and I like the emailed VoiceMail messages - saves a lot of hassle.

    Can I suggest something (blanket suggestion really) ... all families should register themselves a domain name (either .com or .com.au) if they don't already have a business domain name - eg. www.takestock.com.au and grab a basic web hosting account. You can then create an email address (Takethis@takestock.com.au or whatever) and then set up your host to automatically transfer email to your ISP account. You can then change the reply address in your email to your takestock.com.au account).

    So the upshot of that is, if you DO find a better ISP deal, you can easily move, then simply set up the webhost to transfer to the new ISP. All your contacts will just continue emailing you at takethis@takestock.com.au)

    Costs for domain registration will be between $20-$40 per year, and hosting you can probably jag from your ISP or similar for less than $200 per year (maybe even free or minimal cost).

    Just a thought to futureproof your addresses a little. Bit off topic, but hey, its 11 pm ;-)

    Cheers
    Carl
     
  10. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    I second this ... my networked HP Colour LaserJet works flawlessly with my 7 computers all able to print to it whenever they like via LAN or WiFi. Works a treat.
     
  11. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Like Carl said ... you can do this quite cheaply.

    Get a .com address for $14.95 a year plus a basic web hosting account for $9.95 a month from Quadrahosting (who we use to host InvestEd!) ... and you'll never have to change email addresses again!
     
    Last edited: 21st Jun, 2006
  12. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    I think you mean $9.95 per month Sim ? As an annual fee, that'd be a bit of a bargain ;-)

    There are cheaper ways to do what I suggested - $8.95 USD for a .com domain at www.godaddy.com includes free (ad supported) hosting and email forwarding. I've had mixed reports and experiences with them though, so wouldn't use them for crucial business stuff, but for the family idea I mentioned, they might fit the bill. (or lack of bill, as the case may be) :)

    Cheers
    Carl
     
  13. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Oops - fixed my post now. Thanks.

    I use GoDaddy for registering my .com and .net addresses, but not for any hosting.

    The good thing about a service like Quadrahosting is that it is a genuine email hosting solution - with no compromises - no advertising, no web-only interface (webmail is available if you like - or forward to a gmail account or such), full alias and email forwarding support - and all easily configured through your own control panel.
     
  14. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member

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    Wow! thanks for the info everyone.

    I'll try to digest it all and let you know what solution we come up with :D

    Rick
     
  15. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like laptops may be the go - no need for a desktop to set everything up through?

    Sim' - Checked Internode, they have ADSL available in the area but not ADSL2, same with Westnet. A company called Rawnet is offering ADSL2 for 24.95 per month - 5GB.
    Roughly how much would your printer be worth, or should I say cost?

    Carl - You said your Samsung printer gives good colour reproduction - is this a laser printer for $450?
    Thanks for the suggestion regarding domain names, sounds like it is definately worth it.

    Takestock - I like your set-up I hope we can achieve something similar. The bit about getting faxes and answering machine messages sent to your email account is way over my head though :eek:

    Thanks again everyone :D
     
  16. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Laptops have become quite good value for money now - you can get a good laptop for around $1400 that will do most of what you need.

    My advice is to stick with name brands from reputable suppliers. Laptops can be costly to fix if things go wrong.

    Just be careful - not all ADSL services are equal. The quality of the network you are connecting to, the reliability of the connections, and the technical support you get can all make a huge difference to the VALUE of your service.

    If you want to do some comparisons, check out Broadband Choice at Whirlpool - http://bc.whirlpool.net.au/

    ... and check out the discussions at Whirlpool http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/ to see what people are saying about the ISP you are considering. If your ISP isn't covered there ... then they mustn't be a serious player ... steer clear !

    My printer cost me over $2000 when I bought it a couple of years back, but the good news is that prices have plummeted on colour lasers, and you can pick up the newer model HP Colour LaserJet 2600N (has built in ethernet networking!) for only $589 from Harris Technology. I think there is a $50 cashback offer on at the moment too. So cheap now, it's almost cheaper to buy a new printer than to replace all the toner :rolleyes: Don't be fooled by the relatively high cost of toner ... you'll get a LOT of printing out of them - much better value for money than an inkjet.
     
  17. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member

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    Sim - Just been checking your links to the whirlpool forums. Lots of info there. I didn't realise there were forums on internet matters.

    I wonder if there are forums that cover forums :p

    Anyway maybe I should just check for a new package with my current ISP?

    Rick
     
  18. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Co-founder Staff Member

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    Yes, there are several very good ones out there for people who administer forums :D
     
  19. TryHard

    TryHard Well-Known Member

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    Hey Rick - yeah believe it or not its a quality colour laser - I actually went into the specialist printer place to buy a HP, but for all the reasons outlined the admin (not sales!) bloke convinced me the Samsung was a stand-out option - the biggies being 3 year onsite warranty, decent memory, cheap toner (7,000 pages black and 5,000 pages colour yield), and included auto-duplexing. A lot of brands charge a few hundred bucks for the additional auto-duplexing unit.

    www.ht.com.au has a current special $479 (Hardware/Printers/Laser Printers) for the Samsung CLP510 :
    Extra 500 page paper tray
    6ppm colour/24ppm mono duplex laser
    Memory 64 MB (Max. 192 MB)
    Resolution Up to 1,200 x 1,200 dpi effective output
    250 sheet tray, 100 sheet MPF
    3 year onsite warranty
    Some of the lowest operating costs in its class

    However if you wanted to go the fully networked option I notice this model has a fairly expensive network card (Samsung Optional Ethernet and Wireless LAN for CLP-510 = $341) - so it'd be worth shopping around for that add-on or looking for a sharper price on the fully-network-enabled CLP-510N. You could still print over a network without that card, but its just more inconvenient running it via a pc for example.

    So basically, go and ask for some sample print-outs from whichever printers you shortlist, on the same paper stock, and compare those plus the sort of specs above - should help you narrow it down :)

    Cheers !
    Carl
     
  20. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member

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    Still researching :rolleyes:

    Just to clarify. The wires can end at the the wireless router which is connected to the to the cable modem?

    The wireless router has an antenna that sends the signals to the laptops from there, so no need for the cable modem to be hooked up to a PC or laptop then wireless router?

    So in one room there can be the wireless router hooked up to the cable modem and in three seperate other rooms there can be laptops all accessing the internet at the same time???

    Rick:confused: :)